Tag Archives: Laura Moriarty

BEA/NYC in Photos

18th June 2012

Ahh, New York. I was still in recover mode last week, thus the smallish number of posts. But today! Today I give you a gratuitous number of photos to share my time in New York, so even though it’s Monday, you can escape for a bit. Wednesday I’ll be back with the books I picked up and will even share! Mark your calendars.

My brother lives in this wondrous land called Long Island City, or the LIC. Don’t tell, but it’s a fantastic secret neighborhood. Ok, not really, but it feels like it. One short stop from the city, and it’s right by the water and has a fantastic park. When I got in Thursday afternoon, the weather was perfect, and we took a tour of the area.

And, of course, had to get a skyline shot.

Friday, my brother, Matt, took off work, and we wandered the city, eating Cuban corn, seeing the dude from the Mayhem commercials, and watching books hang themselves.

Saturday was a picnic in Prospect Park with friends and fruit, tomato-mozzarella sandwiches, prosecco, and rose. Oh, and the Radical Fairies, a group of men in drag. Never a dull moment.

Brooklyn Botanic Garden, which was free for the day, was our next stop. I’ve wanted to visit for years but have never made it until this trip. Lovely.

The bark on this tree was unlike anything I’d ever seen.

Matt and his beau Christopher relaxing in the softest. grass. ever.

Me and Matt relaxing in the softest. grass. ever. Seriously, I hate grass, but this was almost better than my mattress.

Monday and Book Blog Uncon, which I wrote about last week.

Lori from TNBBC, one half of the reason I had the most fantastic time at BEA. Tara from Book Sexy Review is the other.

Monday evening I went to the IPPY Awards and met Larry Closs, whose fantastic book Beatitude I reviewed here. He won a gold medal in the LGBTQ category, and he and his friend John and I chatted for a good while. It was so nice to meet him!

Amy Shamroe and I. Amy was nice enough to include me in this really cool event, and it was so great to meet her in person.

Tuesday was the official start of BEA, and I met up with Julie from Julz Reads for breakfast before heading to the Javits.

For lunch, the “3 Shades of Jenn” Jenn from Jenn’s Bookshelves, Me, and Jenn from Literate Housewife (not sure I’ve ever been so thrilled to meet a Twitter person in person!) sat down with some great audiobook narrators, including Xe Sands and Karen White, both of whom I know from Twitter.

This was also shortly before I made a total fool of myself in front of The Novogratzes. (Seriously, I called everyone I knew afterward because I was so darn excited to meet this interior design SUPER duo.) I love their style and saw them from a row over. They weren’t signing, but the publicist dragged me over and introduced me because I was a fan. I was shaking and kept saying ridiculous things, but Cortney and I chatted about the Brooklyn Flea Market, and she gave me tips on a couple other places to check out. It was thrilling.

Ashley, Tara from Book Sexy Review, Amanda from Dead White Guys, Rachel from A Home Between Pages, Lori from TNBBC, Me, and Alix from Romance Books Forum

Wednesday may have been the best day ever. Ok, Wednesday was the best day ever. First of all, I attended the Power Reader breakfast at Random House. Just being in Random House? Amazing. Meeting these ladies? Even more amazing.

Farin from The Redheaded Reader, Jenn from Literate Housewife, Jenn from Jenn’s Bookshelves, Swapna from S. Krishna’s Books

I made the rounds, also getting to meet Farin from The Redheaded Reader for the first time.

But this. This right here. How can this not be “best day ever” material? I talked to Nate Berkus, and he was so friendly and kind and handsome. I seriously could barely focus on anything else I was so excited to meet him.

Then I spent the day touring booths. This was at the Chronicle booth where Chris Bonanos had this amazing camera and was taking photos for each copy he signed of his book Instant: The History of the Polaroid.

Wednesday evening I got to meet the fantastic Lydia Hirt of Riverhead Books, who organized a cocktail party for bloggers who were part of a book tour for Laura Moriarty’s The Chaperone.

After that, I dashed over to Central Park where my brother (an event planner) was helping to supervise an important soiree. Christopher (on the right) and I made the most of the evening, watching how the 1% live. ๐Ÿ™‚

Friday I walked the High Line, which is absolutely beautiful. One of the highlights was seeing the artwork some of the residents have as you walk. This installation actually glows in the dark at night. So cool. Shortly after this I went to the Chelsea Market.

Friday afternoon I walked for ages, trying to get to the Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum. When I was two blocks away, I see a sign stating it won’t be open until Fall 2013. So I ducked into the National Academy instead. They had an exhibit called “Women’s Work” – it was really interesting, and they also had a collection of Mary Cassatt’s work, which I love.

Then it was time for some Billy’s Bakery. Banana cupcakes. I don’t even like banana, but these are amazing. I told the guy behind the counter that this craving was a year in the making. He wisely got a big box out. ๐Ÿ™‚

Lusting after a brownstone in Chelsea.

Me and the bro before I left Saturday morning. A huge thanks to both him and Christopher for letting me crash in their dining room – and for making an air mattress the most insanely comfortable thing I’ve slept on aside from my own bed. Love you both.

The Chaperone by Laura Moriarty

29th May 2012

*This book was sent to me by the publisher Riverhead Books (Penguin) for a TLC Book Tour in exchange for an honest review.

It’s the roaring 20s, and amid the controversy of speakeasies, flapper skirts, rising hemlines, and short hairstyles are two women stuck in Wichita, Kansas, each aching for change in different ways. Louise Brooks is 15, intelligent, cynical, and a fantastic dancer ready to start her career by attending the Denishawn School of Dancing, where Martha Graham also originated. Cora Carlisle, on the other hand, is 36, lonely, and curious about her roots. Left in a Home for Friendless Girls in New York at age 3, Cora was later sent out on a train with other girls to be adopted – some as members of the family and others as indentured servants. Though Cora was lucky and loved by the Kaufmann family, she wants to revisit the orphanage to find out anything she can about the mother who left her there.

Offering herself as chaperone to Louise for a month in the summer seems simple enough, but Louise is determined to make it as difficult as possible. She mocks Cora’s lifestyle and beliefs, her strict societal code, the corset she wears faithfully. Cora believes the girl needs a mother, one who will care for her and guide her as Louise’s own mother does not, but slowly she comes to see Louise as wise beyond her years, causing Cora to question her beliefs and open herself up to the possibility of change.

The Chaperone by Laura Moriarty is both a coming-of-age story and a coming-into-her-own story, and the novel has so much heart. Though Louise is the obvious protagonist, she is not who Moriarty focuses the story on. Instead, she tells the story of Cora. Cora, who loves her adoptive family but experiences grief at a young age. Cora, who loves her husband but has no intimacy with him. Cora, whose children are going to college, leaving her alone in the house and lonely.

Cora is a product of her generation. She supports Prohibition and is appalled at the changing trends of the 20s. Choosing to leave her husband for a month to chaperone Louise in New York is a monumental decision, and one that, if her husband didn’t have a secret that could destroy him, she may not have been allowed to make. And Louise doesn’t make it easy; she’s condescending and rude to Cora, holding Cora up as the worst of society. But Cora does the same to Louise, even though she sees moments where Louise is kind, but slowly she realizes the ludicrousness of some of the social mores of her times and begins to change, living a lifestyle Louise would probably approve, and as she notes beautifully about her changing perspective, “She was grateful life could be long.”

That summer is just one part of the book, but its effects follow Cora back to Kansas, and though the latter half of this book witnesses the changes wrought in Cora, at times it felt like a recitation of Cora’s philanthropic goals. However, this isn’t an action novel. It’s intended to be an examination of a life, of Cora as wholly new woman, a woman changed who appreciates her husband Alan in new ways, who is on the board of a home for unwed mothers, and who is unafraid to live a life she loves, even if it is in secret.

As Cora says near the end of the novel:

She was every Cora she’d ever been: Cora X, Cora Kaufmann, Cora Carlisle. She was an orphan on a roof, a lucky girl on a train, a dearly loved daughter by chance. She was a blushing bride of seventeen, a sad and stoic wife, a loving mother, an embittered chaperone, and a daughter pushed away. She was a lover and a lewd cohabitator … a champion of the fallen, and a late-in-coming fighter for reason over fear….she knew who she was.

The Chaperone is a novel of identity and its fluidity, but it’s also a novel of decency and basic human understanding whose power is in highlighting the beauty of something as simple as acceptance and love.

Preorder The Chaperone (out June 5, 2012) by Laura Moriarty from Indiebound or for your Nook.

Check out other reviews at the TLC website.