Blue Monday by Nicci French

5th March 2012

*I received this book from the publisher Pamela Dorman Books/Viking in exchange for an honest review.

Frieda Klein, a psychotherapist, walks the streets of London at night. It’s not her patients or their stories she’s trying to escape, however. She just can’t sleep and finds the quiet of the city at night comforting before facing the day. When her former mentor becomes unreliable, she takes one of his patients, Alan Dekker. Alan can’t have children but has vivid dreams of a child, a redheaded boy who calls him Daddy and plays on the playground. When Frieda sees the news and discovers a redheaded boy has disappeared, she wonders. Could Alan be the culprit? He remembers feeling the same way 20 years earlier, when a young girl was abducted near a candy store. Are Alan’s latent desires expressing themselves in horrific ways? Frieda, unsure of her duty, goes to the police, and embarks on a fraught-filled journey to discover the depths and limitations of the mind.

The husband-wife writing duo Nicci French have written several novels together, but Blue Monday is the first in a series (in which each book will be named after a day of the week) following Frieda Klein. Frieda is complicated. She isn’t close to her family and has few friends, practically none outside her work. She lives alone in a dark flat, and her life is quiet and ordered. Her mentor is struggling, and Frieda’s confidence in him is tempered by her need to get him back on his feet and in the clinic, a need that seems to be personal as much as it is practical. She is unsure how to proceed when she suspects her patient of wrongdoing, and instead of forging boldly ahead, she seeks counsel, even though it’s from her flawed and troubled mentor.

As for the central mystery, once the main twist is revealed, I found it relatively easy to reconstruct the rest. However, after a discussion on Twitter, I think it may be my excessive mystery reading that’s to blame. 😉 In fact, I enjoyed the novel quite a bit. There is a good bit of exposition, but in the first installment of a series, that’s hardly unexpected, and I liked that French doesn’t reveal the details of Frieda’s past life. The ending, though I had anticipated it, was still incredibly chilling and left me with an eerie feeling.

If you’re typically wary of reading books with possible violence to children or with abductions, Blue Monday focused much more on the mind of a kidnapper as opposed to graphic or unnecessary scenes with either child. The aftermath of an abduction on families is difficult to experience, but it also illustrates how differently those faced with such horror react.

Initially, I was concerned that the novel may feel unstable, as I could not recall having read a novel with two writers. The publisher kindly included a Q&A with the pair, and they said, “It’s a question of moving between the two of us. We never decide in advance who’s going to write what chapter, there’s no division….If Sean writes something and I change absolutely nothing about that whole section, but I read it and approve it, then it becomes mine as well. It becomes a kind of Nicci French thing so we both own each word of it.” Interesting. And it worked.

Interested in Blue Monday? Leave me a comment and your email address, and I’ll draw a winner by Friday at midnight.

Blue Monday is out today. Buy your copy from Indiebound or on your Nook.

UPDATE: Giveaway closed. Congrats to Brian Brady for winning a copy of this book!

  • The first book I can remember reading that I knew was written by two authors was “The Talisman” by Stephen King & Peter Straub in 1984. Having read everything by King up to that point, it was easy to tell who was writing which chapters. I was recently shocked to find out that one of my favorite mystery/ police procedurals, The Inspector Ian Rutledge series is written by a mother / son team, Charles and Caroline Todd. Post World War I shell-shocked soldier returns to his job as a Scotland Yard Detective Inspector, dark, historically detailed, I could not have guessed it was two people writing it. Great Review of “Blue Monday” , even if I don’t win your copy, I’ll probably figure out a way to buy it.

    • That’s so funny you mention Charles Todd. I read the first two in the Bess Crawford series last week and loved them. I haven’t tried Ian Rutledge yet but definitely will. And no, I cannot tell two people are at the helm with those books. Pretty cool.

      Thanks so much for the compliment. It was a pretty darn good book, and I look forward to the next one.

  • RebeccaK

    I’m always interested in trying new-to-me crime authors, & this one sounds good. My email is mswordopolisblog at gmail dot com.

    • Awesome! Glad I could introduce you to this one. I’ve heard the other books by this duo are good, too, but I haven’t read any yet.

  • We discussed this a bit already so you know I really liked it, too. If you’re interested in other thrillers written seamlessly by a husband-and-wife team, try Lars Kepler’s THE HYPNOTIST (I think we discussed that, too).

    • I think, I think I bought the audio of this, but it’s been a while. I’ve wanted to read it ever since your review but didn’t remember it was a husband-and-wife team. Really cool!