Category Archives: film

In Which I Liked a Nicholas Sparks Movie…

15th April 2015

For real. So the bff and I rarely get to spend any time together. She’s got three kids; they’re all uber involved in extra activities…yada yada yada. When I realized I’d have a Friday evening to myself, I figured I’d see if I could hang out with her and the kids, but she called and practically yelled in the phone, “It’s meant to be! I don’t have the kids tomorrow! Let’s go see The Longest Ride!”

She hung up about as quickly, leaving me to Google The Longest Ride and then groan. Because The Longest Ride is a Nicholas Sparks movie, based on his book. And I hate Nicholas Sparks films – though that isn’t quite fair, I’ve only watched one – The Notebook – under duress (same bff gave it to me and bugged me for six months until I watched).

Friday afternoon I girded my loins to go the theater to see a film about a cowboy and love. Yech.

At least, I thought I was going to see a mushy film about a cowboy and love. What I actually saw…was a mushy film about a cowboy, and a girl, and an old man thinking back on the love of his life. Cheesy as hell, but I actually liked it.

There was still the obligatory rain scene (I swear, someone could do an academic paper about Sparks’ use of rainy scenes. He must think there’s some real symbolism there or something. Yes! The rain washes away who I used to be and now I am clean and free to love you!). Anyway, there’s also not much in the way of character development: I know two things about Sophia, one of the main characters. She was raised by Polish immigrants. And she likes art.

Similarly, her paramour, Luke, rides bulls to keep his momma on the ranch because Daddy died of a heart attack. But momma doesn’t care about the ranch and wants Luke to stop bull riding because a bull nearly killed him. Motivation enough? I guess.

BUT. The real gem of the film is the relationship between Ruth and Ira, a Jewish couple who meet at the start of World War II, when Ruth’s family immigrates to the US from Vienna. Luke and Sophia save elderly Ira from a car crash, and he asks Sophia to go back for a box of letters that chronicle his relationship with his love. She develops a relationship with the old man, reading him the love letters he wrote and can no longer read and gaining insight into love, life, and relationships.

And I loved it.

Had the majority of the film focused on the contemporary couple, it would have been a snoozefest, but watching Ruth and Ira fall in love in flashbacks and navigate the problems couples encounter was really lovely. Their lifelong love affair was beautiful.

Even though I never thought I’d find myself saying this, I’d actually recommend The Longest Ride. It may be rental material, but if you want a love story that won’t make your eyes roll back in your head (I’m looking at you, every rom-com ever), try this one.

My 10 Favorite Un-Scary Halloween Movies

31st October 2014

10 FUN

For a girl who hates anything scary (we’re talking I hide my eyes and sing when a Law & Order: Criminal Intent commercial comes on), I love Halloween. Maybe it’s that Halloween means fall and changing leaves and chili, but I really enjoy it.

Growing up in my small town, we had a lady everyone called the Good Witch of Groves who sat outside with her pointy had and talked to children and passed out candy minus bloodcurdling screams and bloody eyeballs in a bowl. I loved it. My mom has taken to doing the same in her neighborhood, and I usually go out there for a bit and enjoy the more kitschy side of the holiday.

But my favorite thing to do on Halloween is curl up with some chili (usually with cheddar thrown in for good measure), leftover candy, and a good Halloween movie. Mine may not be traditional, but these have all been in the rotation in the past years, and if you haven’t seen them, I give them all high scores as being perfect for the Halloween weekend:

1. Arsenic and Old Lace (Of course my first pick would star Cary Grant. What do you take me for?)

Mortimer Brewster is flying high on his wedding day and stops off to tell his sweet old aunts and pack his bags…until he discovers they have a dirty little secret, or actually, over a dozen dirty little secrets buried in the basement. What follows is a funny, unsettling romp as Mortimer tries to figure out where to stash the body he’s discovered and how to deal with his psychopathic, criminal brother who suddenly makes an appearance.

2. Clue

This movie needs no introduction really, but in case you haven’t seen it, it is inspired by the game of the same name and takes its characters into the library, the dining room, AND the kitchen to determine who is responsible for the suspicious and sudden deaths. Oh yeah, and just why are they all gathered? Inspired performances by Tim Curry, Madeline Kahn, Eileen Brennan, and many more.

3. Murder by Death

Though not as well known as Clue, Murder by Death is just as endearing. A mystery writer gathers other famous mystery writers at his home, ones with names like Dick and Dora Charleston and Sam Diamond. The invitation is for “dinner and murder,” and murder is, indeed, on the menu. Watching these supposed experts in their fields devolve in the ensuing chaos is absolutely hysterical. Peter Sellars really shines in this one.

4. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

When I taught ESL, I was able to really incorporate the holidays into my lesson planning, and each Halloween I showed this classic, and my students loved it. But who am I kidding? I love it too.

5. Monster House

I rarely watch animated films these days. I don’t have kids, and a lot of them (animated films, not kids) just don’t look that appealing. However, a few years ago I picked this one up and thought it was just the best.

Nebbercracker is known across the neighborhood as the bad-apple neighbor. He destroys anything that lands on his lawn, so when DJ and his friend lose their basketball in his yard, bad things happen. It doesn’t take long before they figure out that something strange is going on, and they’re determined to expose the monster house.

6. The Thin Man (any of them)

If you haven’t read the book, it’s a real treat. And the movies extend the pleasure, particularly as the acting duo of Myrna Loy and William Powell have such amazing on-screen chemistry that they went on to make five additional films, all based on Dashiell Hammett’s characters.

Nick and Nora Charles have returned to New York with their dog, Asta. No longer a detective – and now living off his wife’s money – Nick has some unsavory friends but is determined to go straight. But when a family friend who has been missing is accused of killing his girlfriend, Nick knows he has to get up to his old tricks.

7. The North Avenue Irregulars

Oh how I love this movie. I’m so grateful to my mom and dad for movie nights when we’d watch films that were often before their time as well.

The North Avenue Irregulars is just plain fun. A young Edward Hermann is a progressive minister in a traditional town. When one of his church members loses money meant for the church while gambling, he determines to do something about it. But the local government hasn’t been able to do much good, and it’s only when a group of church women gets in on the action that the crooks begin to worry. Cloris Leachman is absolutely hilarious in this film.

8. That Darn Cat!

Another Disney film, That Darn Cat! stars Haley Mills and Dean Jones. A local bank robbery and kidnapping has Patti Randall’s imagination in high gear. So when her cat comes home with a wristwatch around its neck, she’s convinced it’s a message. She contacts the FBI who then sends out an agent who is – of course – allergic to cats to follow the cat back to the hideout.

9. American Dreamer

I actually haven’t seen this film in ages, but I remember loving it. I need to just buy it.

JoBeth Williams stars as Cathy Palmer, a housewife who wins a trip to Paris in a contest ghostwriting a story about Rebecca Ryan, an international spy. A freak accident sends her into the hospital, and she wakes up thinking she is Rebecca Ryan. In her altered state, she encounters real spies in a laugh-out-loud film.

10. The Ghost and Mr. Chicken

No one does cowardly like Don Knotts. Playing local journalist-hopeful Luther Hegg, he is asked to spend the night in the Old Simmons House, the site of a murder-suicide 20 years earlier, to commemorate the anniversary. Ghostly happenings abound, and Luther may just stumble upon the answer to a decades-old mystery, get his dream job, and win the girl before it’s all over.

Happy Halloween! I hope you enjoy your evening!

 

TLC Tour: Mystery Girl

21st August 2013

15850468

*This book was sent to me by the publisher New Harvest, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in coordination with TLC Book Tours in exchange for an honest review.

I became an assistant detective, and solved my first murder, right after my wife left me, when I went a little mad. Never as crazy as the master detective himself, of course; he was completely nuts….And trust me, I know from crazy, being, as I admit right here at the outset, no poster child for emotional health myself.

Sam Kornberg starts his tale thus, in the great tradition of unreliable narrators before him. His wife Lala has left him; he’s unemployed, and his plotless novels are gathering dust. His only friends are MJ, his former employer who owned (and lost) a used bookstore and frequently went on poetry binges, and Milo, a former gay porn film projectionist who rents videos. Lala likes nice things, and novels without plots and failed bookstores certainly don’t provide for her. In an effort to impress her, Sam takes a job as an assistant to Solar Lonsky, a morbidly obese private eye who can’t leave his home.

Sam is tasked with following Ramona Doon, a beautiful young women with whom he becomes more and more intrigued. Yet he’s perplexed by his job. As he asks himself after observing Ramona one evening, “Was this what he sent me to learn? What mystery could it solve, what crime? Where was the victim, and who the criminal, besides me?”

Sam quickly finds the answer to that question, and as he is drawn deeper into Lonsky’s grip and Ramona’s spellbinding nature, Sam’s seemingly simple job becomes absurdly real, and Satanic rituals, porn, and doppelgangers confuse matters further.

Pulpy and raw, David Gordon’s writing is reminiscent of great noir while still retaining the shockingly real voice of a more modern fiction writer. Mystery Girl is an excellent exploration of a bumbling sad sack writer forced to transcend his own mediocrity.

Add this to your Goodreads shelf.

See This, Not That – Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing

2nd July 2013

Have you guys seen this preview yet?

Because all I have to say about that, is this:

I mean, really.
And if you haven’t seen the latter version, I urge you to spend your pennies and rent it because it’s just the best. I may or may not have spent a week my freshman year in high school watching this over and over again. It’s pretty amazing.