Apr 152015
 

For real. So the bff and I rarely get to spend any time together. She’s got three kids; they’re all uber involved in extra activities…yada yada yada. When I realized I’d have a Friday evening to myself, I figured I’d see if I could hang out with her and the kids, but she called and practically yelled in the phone, “It’s meant to be! I don’t have the kids tomorrow! Let’s go see The Longest Ride!”

She hung up about as quickly, leaving me to Google The Longest Ride and then groan. Because The Longest Ride is a Nicholas Sparks movie, based on his book. And I hate Nicholas Sparks films – though that isn’t quite fair, I’ve only watched one – The Notebook - under duress (same bff gave it to me and bugged me for six months until I watched).

Friday afternoon I girded my loins to go the theater to see a film about a cowboy and love. Yech.

At least, I thought I was going to see a mushy film about a cowboy and love. What I actually saw…was a mushy film about a cowboy, and a girl, and an old man thinking back on the love of his life. Cheesy as hell, but I actually liked it.

There was still the obligatory rain scene (I swear, someone could do an academic paper about Sparks’ use of rainy scenes. He must think there’s some real symbolism there or something. Yes! The rain washes away who I used to be and now I am clean and free to love you!). Anyway, there’s also not much in the way of character development: I know two things about Sophia, one of the main characters. She was raised by Polish immigrants. And she likes art.

Similarly, her paramour, Luke, rides bulls to keep his momma on the ranch because Daddy died of a heart attack. But momma doesn’t care about the ranch and wants Luke to stop bull riding because a bull nearly killed him. Motivation enough? I guess.

BUT. The real gem of the film is the relationship between Ruth and Ira, a Jewish couple who meet at the start of World War II, when Ruth’s family immigrates to the US from Vienna. Luke and Sophia save elderly Ira from a car crash, and he asks Sophia to go back for a box of letters that chronicle his relationship with his love. She develops a relationship with the old man, reading him the love letters he wrote and can no longer read and gaining insight into love, life, and relationships.

And I loved it.

Had the majority of the film focused on the contemporary couple, it would have been a snoozefest, but watching Ruth and Ira fall in love in flashbacks and navigate the problems couples encounter was really lovely. Their lifelong love affair was beautiful.

Even though I never thought I’d find myself saying this, I’d actually recommend The Longest Ride. It may be rental material, but if you want a love story that won’t make your eyes roll back in your head (I’m looking at you, every rom-com ever), try this one.

Oct 312014
 

10 FUN

For a girl who hates anything scary (we’re talking I hide my eyes and sing when a Law & Order: Criminal Intent commercial comes on), I love Halloween. Maybe it’s that Halloween means fall and changing leaves and chili, but I really enjoy it.

Growing up in my small town, we had a lady everyone called the Good Witch of Groves who sat outside with her pointy had and talked to children and passed out candy minus bloodcurdling screams and bloody eyeballs in a bowl. I loved it. My mom has taken to doing the same in her neighborhood, and I usually go out there for a bit and enjoy the more kitschy side of the holiday.

But my favorite thing to do on Halloween is curl up with some chili (usually with cheddar thrown in for good measure), leftover candy, and a good Halloween movie. Mine may not be traditional, but these have all been in the rotation in the past years, and if you haven’t seen them, I give them all high scores as being perfect for the Halloween weekend:

1. Arsenic and Old Lace (Of course my first pick would star Cary Grant. What do you take me for?)

Mortimer Brewster is flying high on his wedding day and stops off to tell his sweet old aunts and pack his bags…until he discovers they have a dirty little secret, or actually, over a dozen dirty little secrets buried in the basement. What follows is a funny, unsettling romp as Mortimer tries to figure out where to stash the body he’s discovered and how to deal with his psychopathic, criminal brother who suddenly makes an appearance.

2. Clue

This movie needs no introduction really, but in case you haven’t seen it, it is inspired by the game of the same name and takes its characters into the library, the dining room, AND the kitchen to determine who is responsible for the suspicious and sudden deaths. Oh yeah, and just why are they all gathered? Inspired performances by Tim Curry, Madeline Kahn, Eileen Brennan, and many more.

3. Murder by Death

Though not as well known as Clue, Murder by Death is just as endearing. A mystery writer gathers other famous mystery writers at his home, ones with names like Dick and Dora Charleston and Sam Diamond. The invitation is for “dinner and murder,” and murder is, indeed, on the menu. Watching these supposed experts in their fields devolve in the ensuing chaos is absolutely hysterical. Peter Sellars really shines in this one.

4. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

When I taught ESL, I was able to really incorporate the holidays into my lesson planning, and each Halloween I showed this classic, and my students loved it. But who am I kidding? I love it too.

5. Monster House

I rarely watch animated films these days. I don’t have kids, and a lot of them (animated films, not kids) just don’t look that appealing. However, a few years ago I picked this one up and thought it was just the best.

Nebbercracker is known across the neighborhood as the bad-apple neighbor. He destroys anything that lands on his lawn, so when DJ and his friend lose their basketball in his yard, bad things happen. It doesn’t take long before they figure out that something strange is going on, and they’re determined to expose the monster house.

6. The Thin Man (any of them)

If you haven’t read the book, it’s a real treat. And the movies extend the pleasure, particularly as the acting duo of Myrna Loy and William Powell have such amazing on-screen chemistry that they went on to make five additional films, all based on Dashiell Hammett’s characters.

Nick and Nora Charles have returned to New York with their dog, Asta. No longer a detective – and now living off his wife’s money – Nick has some unsavory friends but is determined to go straight. But when a family friend who has been missing is accused of killing his girlfriend, Nick knows he has to get up to his old tricks.

7. The North Avenue Irregulars

Oh how I love this movie. I’m so grateful to my mom and dad for movie nights when we’d watch films that were often before their time as well.

The North Avenue Irregulars is just plain fun. A young Edward Hermann is a progressive minister in a traditional town. When one of his church members loses money meant for the church while gambling, he determines to do something about it. But the local government hasn’t been able to do much good, and it’s only when a group of church women gets in on the action that the crooks begin to worry. Cloris Leachman is absolutely hilarious in this film.

8. That Darn Cat!

Another Disney film, That Darn Cat! stars Haley Mills and Dean Jones. A local bank robbery and kidnapping has Patti Randall’s imagination in high gear. So when her cat comes home with a wristwatch around its neck, she’s convinced it’s a message. She contacts the FBI who then sends out an agent who is – of course – allergic to cats to follow the cat back to the hideout.

9. American Dreamer

I actually haven’t seen this film in ages, but I remember loving it. I need to just buy it.

JoBeth Williams stars as Cathy Palmer, a housewife who wins a trip to Paris in a contest ghostwriting a story about Rebecca Ryan, an international spy. A freak accident sends her into the hospital, and she wakes up thinking she is Rebecca Ryan. In her altered state, she encounters real spies in a laugh-out-loud film.

10. The Ghost and Mr. Chicken

No one does cowardly like Don Knotts. Playing local journalist-hopeful Luther Hegg, he is asked to spend the night in the Old Simmons House, the site of a murder-suicide 20 years earlier, to commemorate the anniversary. Ghostly happenings abound, and Luther may just stumble upon the answer to a decades-old mystery, get his dream job, and win the girl before it’s all over.

Happy Halloween! I hope you enjoy your evening!

 

Mar 042014
 

pg1*I received this ebook from the publisher Melville House in exchange for an honest review.

Billy Ridgeway is a do-nothing. He works at a Greek deli when he can make it on time. He thinks his girlfriend may have dumped him, but he’s not sure. And the short stories he’s written are pure crap – he’s got a writeup in an NYC lit magazine to prove it. When the Devil shows up in his apartment with good, no, great coffee and offers to publish Billy’s novel if he’ll just do him a tiny favor, Billy isn’t even tempted. Ok, maybe a little. All he has to do is steal the Neko of Infinite Equilibrium, a cat statue, from a powerful warlock.

At first, Billy can’t be bothered. If he can’t even get his girlfriend to return his calls, how could he possibly face a warlock? But soon, whether or not Billy wants to help the Devil isn’t an option as he’s in up to his neck and discovers he’s a hell wolf and that his entire life up to this point has been a lie. As he races across the city, Billy learns a lot about what he’s capable of, and if he lives through this weirdness, maybe he’ll be able to do something after all.

The Weirdness is absolutely, positively one of the most original takes on the nearing middle age, suffering male writer bit. Because frankly, had this been another story about a guy who is too lazy to get off his ass and do something, I’d have hated it. Hell, I may not have even finished it. But Jeremy Bushnell manages to turn this story on its head in what should be the most ridiculous novel you’ve ever read.

Instead, Billy and his really lovely counterparts, specifically his best friend Anil, are people you feel for. They’re doing what they have to in order to make it. Maybe Billy hasn’t been doing his part, but he’s obviously unhappy. He has a job that is fine but isn’t a career. His writing isn’t transcendent. His love life…yeah, it’s not great. In a lot of ways, Billy has just shut down, and he can’t figure out how to restart until the Devil shows up. And ain’t that the way of things? Ok, maybe the Devil doesn’t really show up in order for you or me to get out of our funks, but it takes something pretty out of character or, in this case, out of this world.

Add this to your Goodreads shelf.

Feb 062014
 

pg1*I received this book from the publisher Bourbon Street Books in exchange for an honest review.

Jessica Mayhew’s psychotherapy office is a sanctuary of sorts. She goes in, listens to her patients, and goes home. Her life is routine, and she likes it that way. But her routine is disturbed when her husband admits to sleeping with a younger woman in what he says was a one-night stand. Her teenage daughter Nella has pulled away from her. And at work, a new client, Gwydion Morgan, an actor and the son of famous film director Evan Morgan, unsettles Jessica.

Gwydion has a phobia of buttons and is concerned it may affect his work in a period film. However, as their sessions continue, a recurring dream Gwydion has dominates their sessions. In the dream, he is a child on his father’s boat. He hears a disturbance and then a splash before he wakes up, unnerved. When Jessica makes a house call after Gwydion’s mother calls her, concerned he may be suicidal, she learns Gwydion’s au pair drowned at their cliff side home, and she begins to wonder if Gwydion’s dream is reality. What really happened to the au pair?

The House on the Cliff - beginning with its cover – looked like an absolutely perfect read for the dreary January weather we’ve been having. Set in Wales, the tone and the subject matter are eery and dark. However, the longer I read, the more I had to shake my head. I thoroughly enjoy mysteries whose detecting character isn’t necessarily a detective. That said, the main character should also exhibit a sense of investigation that makes his or her foray into detecting plausible. Instead, Jessica is a bit of a mess. She is certainly curious, but she never seems to pair her curiosity with rational, measured thought. Unable to forgive her husband for the affair, she quickly entangles herself with her patient (!), delves into his family history without authorization, manages to alienate and place her daughter in danger, and make an altogether ridiculously foolish move at the end of the book. Though I enjoyed the writing, The House on the Cliff left me wondering if Jessica Mayhew is capable of leading a mystery series.

If you’re so inclined, add this to your Goodreads shelf.

Feb 042014
 

pg1*I received this ebook from the publisher Touchstone in exchange for an honest review.

“I, to this day, hold to only one truth: if a man chooses to carry a gun he will get shot. My father agreed to carry twelve.”

Thomas Walker is 12 when his father decides to venture out West to sell Samuel Colt’s Improved Revolving Gun. But a mere three days into the journey, Walker’s father is shot dead, and Thomas is left to find his way home with nothing but a gelding, a wagon, and a wooden model gun for protection. He encounters Henry Stands, a former ranger who reluctantly takes on responsibility for Thomas as they make their way back East. Told from the adult Thomas’s recollections, Road to Reckoning is part dime store novel and part coming-of-age tale.

Road to Reckoning was my first “wow” novel of 2014. Lautner’s choice to have an older Thomas narrate his tale allows for poignant moments of recollection, such as when he talks about journeying out with his father and the anticipation he felt:

Every word he spoke would be to me.

It is a fault of nature that fathers do not realize that when the son is young the father is like Jesus to him, and like with Our Lord, the time of his ministry when they crave his words is short and fleeting.

These observations aren’t often enough to become laborious, but they fit well in the telling. At the same time, Thomas also recognizes that his father doesn’t belong in the West, and his brief time there is evidence of that. Thomas can’t help but grudgingly look up to Henry Stands. Henry Stands, with his foreign gun the Native Americans think is magic, swaggers into this story and into Thomas’s life with a charisma that becomes the stuff of legends. Though he’d just as soon be without the burden of a young boy, he also recognizes his duty, leading to one of the best scenes in the book, when Stands faces down a group of men with nothing but a wooden pistol:

What you may make of a man approaching abomination with a wooden pistol in his hands is your faith’s decision. If you are young I hope it does not inspire too much. If you are older you may think Henry Stands foolish, or worse, bitten by madness, or you may yet feel something rising in your chest at the thought of yourself about to stand down four armed men with nothing but your valor and self as your only true weapon. I have given you only a wooden toy.

Though most of the comparisons call True Grit and The Sisters Brothers companion reads, much of Road to Reckoning reminded me of Huck and Jim’s journey in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Just as Huck and Jim are an unlikely pair who do fine with one another as long as they’re on the Mississippi, Thomas and Henry’s tenuous alliance seems sure until others interfere.

A product of the West*, Road to Reckoning fits its setting well while also tempting readers with its story of danger and derring do and the after effects on the young man at the heart of it all.

Add this to your Goodreads shelf.

*Lautner does a masterful job with his depiction of the West, particularly as the author lives in Wales (!).

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